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  • Paint project

    Topic originally created by Aaron on August 27, 2005 12:35 AM and viewed 1998 times in the old forum.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Aaron on August 27, 2005 12:35 AM
    I thought I saw a post regarding someone painting there C4 - I’m just now acquiring the “stuff” to start that project. My intention is to do it the slow and painful way – taking the body to metal with a DA. I will order PPG 2 part paint from an auto body supply warehouse next week – Gainsborough celeste. I have some “Aircraft stripper” for the inside of the hood, but do not have a solution for the hood padding yet – I had heard that some of the hood pads were silver, which I would prefer over black, but not at the expense of being un-original. Upholstery is also on the list. I have not yet found a satisfactory shop or person in my area. anyone have any hints? Aaron

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Bryan on August 28, 2005 6:52 AM
      Aaron: do you have access to a paint booth or just a tight garage?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Aaron on August 30, 2005 10:26 AM
        I have a well sealed garage that I have draped in the past - with reasonable results on small projects. One of the issue with the C4 is that there are no seams in the body at which to stop. You just have to go around and get the whole thing we at once. I'm haveing some second thoughts based on that specific procedure. Aaron

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ian Levy on August 30, 2005 5:28 PM
          Hi Aaron Having read your posts & received much help from you in the past I know just how skilled & knowledgeable you are. Work on the mechanics of a car can be done often as good as or better than some so called experts but I think painting a car is different. These are now $80k motor cars & I think a top car painter will do a better job. You are also correct about the lack of seams & therefore the lack of finishing lines -this makes it much harder for even the accomplished experts. I would do all the prep work myself up to the colour & then give it over to a guy you can trust. I presented my guy with the car down to the bare metal shell & then gave it over. He reckoned I had saved half the cost. I did not do any paint in primer as the car required some metal work at the bottom of the doors & on two wings. If yours is rust free you can give it over almost ready to paint FWIW that is my opinion & advice Regards Ian L

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JeffLit on August 31, 2005 7:28 AM
            I agree with Ian. Having painted more than one car in a garage, I can attest to the fact that results are better (or at least a lot easier) with a down-draft paint booth. In the old days (makes me feel like a geezer) I would shoot lacquer in many coats, with color sanding between each until I got the finish and lack of blems I was looking for. Fortunately, a bug or a sag or some dust could just be sanded away and then covered in the next coat. Took a lot of time though. Even with today's HPLV guns, water on the floor to catch dust, and other precautions, the non-ducted garage booth will result in a lot of surface texture due to overspray floating around and settling on flat surfaces. Nowadays, I can't buy lacquer in California, and frankly the paint is so soft I wouldn't want to. Today you shoot a base color coat that doesn't have to be perfect but does have to be close, and then you immediately follow with a clear. These are very durable finishes with great depth. The good news is that the clear coat adheres perfectly to the base coat and can be color sanded to glass-smooth perfection without worrying about clouding up metallics, etc. This color sanding process can make up for a multitude of minor spray sins (such as orange peel). The bad news is that you only get one chance to do it right and you can't cover up bugs, runs, or anything other than very minor blems. If you screw up the base coat then it is basically back to square one. If you shoot the base wonderfully and then screw up the clear then you cry yourself to sleep. And clears are hard to shoot because they are hard to see. As Ian says, most of the labor is in prep. If you can do your own disassembly, sanding, striping, bodywork, sealing, priming, block sanding, etc. and present a painter with a car that is truly ready for paint then the cost of having him shoot it will be quite reasonable. You could even do your own color sanding, buffing, polishing and glazing after it has been shot. That's what I'd do.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Aaron on September 2, 2005 8:48 AM
              Jeff, Good solid advice – and I have capitulated to the reality that I am not capable of doing the job that the car deserves. I have a painter sorted lined up for some time in the future – I did some testing with paint left over from my daughters BMW – and the dust issue is significant. I never saw the dust in the air, but there it is in the clear coat. Thanks, Aaron

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