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  • Refrigerant changeout

    Topic originally created by Bryan on August 28, 2005 12:34 PM and viewed 2375 times in the old forum.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Bryan on August 28, 2005 12:34 PM
    I recall that someome here has mentioned changing their R12 to R134a in the past, but I can't find anything in my archived e-mails. Sorry for the hassle, but I think it would be useful for anyone that has done this to post their actions, parts, and experiences for posterity! Thanks

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Michael Bayer on August 28, 2005 11:21 PM
      I did a change over on my Suburban last year, it is a no brainer, and works OK, but it will work better still if you get the system FULLY pumped out before you add the replacement gas. Start to finish it takes about 30 minutes and the entire kit costs far less than 1/2 pound of freon - uninstalled. The down side is that performance is some what degraded, not an issue in American sedans. Aside from degrading a less than ample cooling system as most Ferrari 12s are, the real hassle is the location of the low side connection (the one cool to touch when running which has to be converted to the new connection to put the new gas in after the old is pumped out. This is typically done by adding the new port on top of the old, in my 330 (and I believe my US GTC/4 - but it is home - I am on vacation) there is not room to pile one on with the radiator so close, necessitaing some sort of an adaptor hose which should not be that hard to make. Bottom line, if you are not plagued by leaks I would strongly recommend you keep the freon, if you can't get the system absolutely tight, switch it out to the cheep (and I realize this is oximoronic with a early 70s 12 - environmentally friendly) product which you can get from any from Pep Boys or K Mart. Michael Bayer

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Bryan on August 29, 2005 12:18 PM
        I ran across the following info http://autocool-refrigerants.com/pro...tm#tech%20page This is a drop-in for R-12, i.e. no oil change, no efficiency loss. Downside seems to be that it is a hydrocarbon. Anyone tried this? John Bishop: I understand hydrocarbons refrigerants are banned in Oz in motor vehicles. Any thoughts?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JBishop on August 29, 2005 4:26 PM
          Bryan I know there are a pile of laws re refrigerent gases in Australia. I had to completely empty the R12 from the system before import. Now the silly thing is there was no requirement to prove that the R12 was removed in an environmentally friendly way, so I guess the system could have just been bled to atmosphere, as opposed to the gas still being contained within a closed system. But at least the R12 polluted the USA atmosphere as opposed to the Australian atmosphere. Makes sense !!!!!!! I do not know the specific regulations. John

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Aaron on August 30, 2005 7:35 AM
            Changing to R134 - I did this a while back, posted the actions, but have not looked hard enough to find it – so, based on an often-foggy memory - I started with system empty – pulled that York compressor. There are oil fill holes on the sides, I dumped out what oil was in it and filled it with 134 compatible (I think it was silicon based) oil. I bought the oil at the local Napa store along with a couple of pounds of R134. – Yes, it did at one time come in 16 once cans. I changed the receiver dryer – a parker unit (I have an extra if anyone has trouble finding one) I put everything back together and hooked up my gauge set. The valves on the Ferrari York compressor are very nice – they open by turning them clockwise – (use the “ratchet” side of a ¼ inch drive socket to turn the valves.) I cracked both valves on the compressor and opened both valves on the gauges. I have a inexpensive vacuum pump that works off compressed air – using this I pulled the vacuum down to about 29 inches, closed the valves on the gauges and disconnected the vacuum. From this point on, it is charging like normal. Connect the Freon to the gauge center, and opened the low side valve on the gauges, the vacuum in the system will assist the pressurized can in loading the system. As the pressure equalized, start the engine and turn on the AC to Full/High. Stick a feeler gauge between the fast Idle cam and the adjustment screw to push the idle up to 1800 RPM, and slowly continue adding Freon until you reach “full enough” . “full enough” >>What I look for on a 90 degree F day – about 215 PSI on the high side and 30 PSI on the low side. If the unit is working correctly, you will get a 30+ degree drop in temperature between ambient in the cabin and the air coming out of the vents. I thought it took a bit over one pound – it was a long time ago. A 180-PSI delta between the high side and the low side is quite adequate. Over charging just increases the overall pressure, causes the unit to work harder and increases your change of breaking something. It will not enhance cooling. (I know, I have tried it) My AC actually works pretty well. Good luck Aaron

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bryan on September 3, 2005 7:28 AM
              RE: Hydrocarbon refrigerants. I asked earlier about the use of HC refrigerants. Here's what I found. http://www.autoacforum.com/MACS/HCwarning.pdf http://www.epa.gov/Ozone/snap/refrig.../hc12alng.html

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Bryan on September 3, 2005 12:28 PM
                Aaron: what is the model number of the Parker drier that you installed? FYI http://www.parker.com/mobileac/cat/english/6225.pdf

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Aaron on September 5, 2005 8:51 AM
                  Bryan, didn't have a chance to down load your attachment - only have 50k modem rignt now - Anyway It was a Climate Pro repackage - the Climate Pro number is 540030 Receiver/drier In the box is a Parker, Filter-Dryer -Receiver 33-0043A Made in USA, division of Lyons, NY. I got these at Napa (where else) and I think they were under $20 each. For my car, it was an exact bolt in, hook up replacement for use with R134a along with R12 and a bunch other types. Aaron

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