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  • Header Removal

    Topic originally created by Mike Meehan on March 21, 2008 4:17 AM and viewed 4539 times in the old forum.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mike Meehan on March 21, 2008 4:17 AM
    Hi guys, the weather is getting a bit better and as Im soon to be back in the garage I have another job to start on my list. I am going to take the headers off to have them ceranic coated . Any tips on this . Will they come out from the top or from the bottom,any horror stories with gaskets etc. Thanks ,Mike

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Bryan on March 21, 2008 9:05 AM
      Mike: I did this once some time ago, when I was even more a C4 novice than now! I was replacing the exhaust system from the headers back also, so I took everything off from below. However, I still had to take off the carbs to get at some of the header nuts. I took the headers out along with the exhaust, because I wanted to replace the heat shield casing which was rusted on the right side. I wish that I had just taken them off and done what you plan. Maybe someone with better insight was able to do it all from below and leave the carbs in place. If your OEM heat shield is still in place, watch out for the fibers from the glass insulation inside the metal casing. They aren't asbestos, but they can be irritating.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Aaron on March 29, 2008 3:27 AM
        Does anyone have pictures of US headers with the heat shields on them? And are the heat shields made of aluminum, or stainless? My headers are “bare” - to reduce heat in the engine compartment, (improve exhaust flow) and possibly get it back to more original, I was toying with the idea of fabricating a set. Thanks, Aaron

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Trachsel on March 30, 2008 2:56 PM
          Hi Aaron, I can only say what is on my European car : bare headers with heat shields made of aluminium, with black shrinkcolour on the topside. Jacques

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Aaron on April 10, 2008 12:14 AM
            Best I can tell, US headers are packed in an insulator and then shielded in an aluminum blanket. My racer friends have always insisted that keeping the exhaust hot through the headers maintains volume and port velocity, such that performance is increased. The other advantage is the reduction in engine compartment heat. I have toyed with the idea of just wrapping the headers – more to reduce engine compartment heat than anything else. Aaron

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Michael Bayer on April 10, 2008 12:59 AM
              I have always thought the US cars came with the heat shields because the injected air made for a much hotter exhaust temp. If your air pump is off, the temps should be the same as a Euro car. By the way I pulled the air injectors out of my system replacing them with stainless plugs, it made a very significant increase in performance

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mike Meehan on April 10, 2008 2:20 AM
                Aaron ,I would be cautious about wraping the headers. I dont know this for a fact but have heard that the wraping material can cause premature deterioration of the metal.The stuff works but on drag cars and bikes where things are more out in the open perhaps the air circulation makes a difference. Anyone else have experience here? Mike

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Aaron on April 10, 2008 4:57 AM
                  Mike, Good point about the deterioration , hadn’t thought about that. Michael - I never had a smog pump - but I do believe you. That is also an interesting point about not needing the heat shield. Had not thought about it either. Maybe I’ll just coat them white and forget about it. The headers are stainless - I had a crack in one of the joints that I got welded up. Thanks Guys, Aaron

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bill26 on April 10, 2008 7:11 PM
                    A couple of thoughts; The increase in corosion is probably due to the older type insulation materials holding any moisture/condensation against the exhaust (when they cool down). Stainless steel is an extremely poor conductor of heat - therefore a good material for headers (keeps the heat in). Ceramic coating of headers is extremely effective in keeping heat in the exhaust (better performance) and heat out of the engine bay (better for the other stuff living there). If you have a ceramic coated stainless system you have double benefit - I have ceramic coated headers on my C4 (silver but painted black where you can see them) and ceramic coated s/s on my turbocharged Lotus 7 replica (PRB in Australia) and ceramic coated s/s on my Honda powered Lotus Elise. Very Effective in keeping the heat where it is supposed to be which is critical in both of these cars with a lack of real estate in the engine bays. WM

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JeffLit on April 12, 2008 1:22 AM
                      As mentioned, the US spec cars had their headers insulated by some sort of fiberglass/asbestos-like material and then that was covered by some crudely made sheet steel covers. The combination tended to hold moisture and rust. Below you will find a number of pictures of mine, which I had to cut off. I still have all these pieces and intend someday to reproduce them but you need a set of headers off the car in order to make and shape and weld them and I've never cared enough to remove my headers again in order to do the job. If you look, you'll see that there are some pretty crude tabs and overlaps and spot welds. I don't think US smog equipment was Ferrari's passion.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Aaron on April 16, 2008 11:21 AM
                        Jeff, Those are awesome pictures - just what I need - although a little discouraging with the corrosion. Wish I had made it to the Palisade run last march, could have talked to you further on the subject. Bye the way, the new engine (with correct timing and lighter/bigger pistons) runs beautifully - the only bench mark I have is that it easily walks away from a Porsche 993. What did you end up doing with your headers? Aaron

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JeffLit on April 16, 2008 3:30 PM
                          I ended up ceramic coating (jet hot) them black and installing without those wraps/shields. I run with the air pump relay unplugged and I've never noticed my headers to be hot. That's a mighty impressive benchmark for a car that's a lot heavier. Congratulations.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ian Levy on April 16, 2008 5:00 PM
                            Aaron As Jeff says you must have a real flying machine now & blowing off a 993 must have been really satisfying. Did you fit JE psitons & if so what size are they as from what you are saying it is about time I really put my loud pedal to the floor? I wish you a good summer of happy & exciting motoring Regards Ian

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Aaron on April 17, 2008 1:58 AM
                              Ian, Jeff Well – as much as it sounds great – it was just a normal 993 Targa with tiptronic transmission - I believe they have 280 some odd hp and 0-100 km/hour is in the 7.1 range. So I would think being a bit faster would be "normal". The only formal US road test I have ever read was from Road&Track and it was performed 4000 ft above sea level with all the smog equipment. The test results had the C4 do 0-60mph in 7.2 seconds. I did see Euro road test data a while back where the 0-100km time was more like 6.4 seconds. Regardless - It has been a lot of fun. Regarding the pistons - The bores were taken out .017" – the pistons are 3.204 inches (81.38mm) and I believe the bore to piston clearance to be a bout .0025" or (.06mm). Piston weight is 268 grams – about an ounce and a half (42 grams) lighter than stock. my best to everyone, Aaron

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