Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Header Removal

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Trachsel on January 25, 2009 10:45 PM
    My centre part is over 15 years old and still in order of function. The end boxes are over 10 years old and not rotten, because I drilled a hole of 3 mm in the muffler at the deepest point. So all the acidic water can drain out.
    And I never start the engine only to here the 12 cylinder sound. When I start the engine, I go for a drive until water and oil get to normal temperature.

    Jacques

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by dkblueUK on January 25, 2009 6:14 PM
    Hello Rick,
    You have misunderstood slightly - what I now have is a stainless steel copy of the Ansa system from the headers back, including the centre boxes. The original system was cut apart in order to copy the construction, which is why it sounds the same as a mild steel one.
    It is always the rear boxes that rot, because they slope down at the front, and all the acidic combustion products sit there and rot them from the inside out. Mind you they last about 10 years.
    My complete system cost around £1200, fitted, in 2004.
    Regards,
    Neil

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by rickkaufman on January 25, 2009 2:02 PM
    Neil, The original ANSA rear resonators are available for the Euro car right now if you wanted them from Ted Rutland in Atlanta, Georga iUSA. I bought a set. They look good in the plastic. I have not installed them yet. My problem is actually with the center sections. Mine (the original Ansa) are shot, and I can't find any US center sections by Ansa. I do have an entire set from Stebro. But I am not confident that i want to install them, as I doubt it'll sound good. So you have an Ansa center section with a stainless repro rear, and it sounds good. I should mention that if you have the original ones and you want to rebuild them, there is a firm in San Diego, California that will rebuild them I think he's a licensed dealer: Gary Bobileff - [email protected]. They charge about $3,000 USD for the center sections. I don't know what they charge for rear sections. I'll keep hunting. Gracias, R

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by dkblueUK on January 23, 2009 8:29 PM
    Hello Rick,
    When I bought my car, it had a stainless system from the headers back. I didn't like the sound because it droned at around 70mph, which I found annoying. I replaced it with a new Ansa system ( when you could still buy them ! ), and everything was back to normal with the proper exhaust noise. Eventually, the bottoms of the rear silencers boxes started to rot from the inside out , so I took the Ansa system off, and had it duplicated in stainless, i.e same silencer and pipe construction - different steel. Also got them to spray it with black VHT paint, so it looks like the Ansa. Got some Ansa stickers,and put them on the tailpipes, so it now looks like an Ansa system, and more importantly - sounds like an Ansa system.
    I still have the first, noisy system leaning against the garage wall - it's too good to throw away, but I don't know what to do with it - any sensible suggestions welcome.
    My system all hangs off rubber bands, except for the the rear silencers, which use Silentblc bobbins.
    Neil.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Bryan on January 21, 2009 10:44 AM
    I replaced my OEM center and rear sections with Stebro sections. They took a long time to finish them, but the fit between sections and the header and the weld work on the stainless steel is excellent. The tubing is 1/4 inch larger diameter. No discernible change in exhaust tone, warble, tweet, etc.
    I'm not sure that Stebro is as commercially robust as it was then (and it still took a long time). Worth some research before ordering.
    Bryan

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by rickkaufman on January 18, 2009 7:42 AM
    Guys,
    My exhaust saga continues. I'm repainting my car, and have finally decided to figure out the Euro/US exhaust issue at the same time. I'm cutting off the Euro "bracket" in order to modify it to accept the US rubber hangers. I'm curious if anyone has had any issues with this "cut/weld" method. I have seen US Daytonas with this modification, but not on a C/4. Also, has anyone ever seen a US and a Euro center section FE1325 side by side? I have heard a rumor that the Euro model of the ANSA 1325 is wider. I find that hard to believe, as the chassis must be the same width and length. I'm not so concerned with the modification to the asbestos ring, but the issue of width is giving me pause. Last, I am curious if anyone who has installed a new stainless center section with spec ANSA rear resonators..... Did that cause a change in the exhaust note? I am prepared to weld shut the extra intakes on the Euro center sections for my US headers-- but I am not eager to use stainless center sections if the exhaust note is different... Gracias, Rick

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by rickkaufman on May 3, 2008 9:04 AM
    Aaron, I recently wrapped mine in the white "tape" roll. It doesn't look too bad, and does a good job. If you would like to see a photo or two, I can post. I admit, in hindsight, that ceramic coating in black is probably a better idea. I understand that the European spec motor did not have any insulation when they left the factory. Ian, did your car have the insulation? - Rick

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Aaron on April 17, 2008 1:58 AM
    Ian, Jeff Well – as much as it sounds great – it was just a normal 993 Targa with tiptronic transmission - I believe they have 280 some odd hp and 0-100 km/hour is in the 7.1 range. So I would think being a bit faster would be "normal". The only formal US road test I have ever read was from Road&Track and it was performed 4000 ft above sea level with all the smog equipment. The test results had the C4 do 0-60mph in 7.2 seconds. I did see Euro road test data a while back where the 0-100km time was more like 6.4 seconds. Regardless - It has been a lot of fun. Regarding the pistons - The bores were taken out .017" – the pistons are 3.204 inches (81.38mm) and I believe the bore to piston clearance to be a bout .0025" or (.06mm). Piston weight is 268 grams – about an ounce and a half (42 grams) lighter than stock. my best to everyone, Aaron

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Ian Levy on April 16, 2008 5:00 PM
    Aaron As Jeff says you must have a real flying machine now & blowing off a 993 must have been really satisfying. Did you fit JE psitons & if so what size are they as from what you are saying it is about time I really put my loud pedal to the floor? I wish you a good summer of happy & exciting motoring Regards Ian

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by JeffLit on April 16, 2008 3:30 PM
    I ended up ceramic coating (jet hot) them black and installing without those wraps/shields. I run with the air pump relay unplugged and I've never noticed my headers to be hot. That's a mighty impressive benchmark for a car that's a lot heavier. Congratulations.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Aaron on April 16, 2008 11:21 AM
    Jeff, Those are awesome pictures - just what I need - although a little discouraging with the corrosion. Wish I had made it to the Palisade run last march, could have talked to you further on the subject. Bye the way, the new engine (with correct timing and lighter/bigger pistons) runs beautifully - the only bench mark I have is that it easily walks away from a Porsche 993. What did you end up doing with your headers? Aaron

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by JeffLit on April 12, 2008 1:22 AM
    As mentioned, the US spec cars had their headers insulated by some sort of fiberglass/asbestos-like material and then that was covered by some crudely made sheet steel covers. The combination tended to hold moisture and rust. Below you will find a number of pictures of mine, which I had to cut off. I still have all these pieces and intend someday to reproduce them but you need a set of headers off the car in order to make and shape and weld them and I've never cared enough to remove my headers again in order to do the job. If you look, you'll see that there are some pretty crude tabs and overlaps and spot welds. I don't think US smog equipment was Ferrari's passion.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Bill26 on April 10, 2008 7:11 PM
    A couple of thoughts; The increase in corosion is probably due to the older type insulation materials holding any moisture/condensation against the exhaust (when they cool down). Stainless steel is an extremely poor conductor of heat - therefore a good material for headers (keeps the heat in). Ceramic coating of headers is extremely effective in keeping heat in the exhaust (better performance) and heat out of the engine bay (better for the other stuff living there). If you have a ceramic coated stainless system you have double benefit - I have ceramic coated headers on my C4 (silver but painted black where you can see them) and ceramic coated s/s on my turbocharged Lotus 7 replica (PRB in Australia) and ceramic coated s/s on my Honda powered Lotus Elise. Very Effective in keeping the heat where it is supposed to be which is critical in both of these cars with a lack of real estate in the engine bays. WM

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Aaron on April 10, 2008 4:57 AM
    Mike, Good point about the deterioration , hadn’t thought about that. Michael - I never had a smog pump - but I do believe you. That is also an interesting point about not needing the heat shield. Had not thought about it either. Maybe I’ll just coat them white and forget about it. The headers are stainless - I had a crack in one of the joints that I got welded up. Thanks Guys, Aaron

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Mike Meehan on April 10, 2008 2:20 AM
    Aaron ,I would be cautious about wraping the headers. I dont know this for a fact but have heard that the wraping material can cause premature deterioration of the metal.The stuff works but on drag cars and bikes where things are more out in the open perhaps the air circulation makes a difference. Anyone else have experience here? Mike

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X